Suzuki bikes – La Bougeotte http://www.labougeotte.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:47:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.labougeotte.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Suzuki bikes – La Bougeotte http://www.labougeotte.org/ 32 32 Suzuki Gixxer Monotone: The king of commuters https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-gixxer-monotone-the-king-of-commuters/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-gixxer-monotone-the-king-of-commuters/ Suzuki Gixxer Monotone: The king of commuters Shamit Reza 23 November 2022, 12:00 Last modification: November 23, 2022, 12:02 p.m. The first generation Gixxer 155 is considered to be one of the most successful range of bicycles available in Bangladesh Shamit Reza 23 November 2022, 12:00 Last modification: November 23, 2022, 12:02 p.m. Suzuki Gixxer […]]]>

Suzuki Gixxer Monotone: The king of commuters

Shamit Reza

23 November 2022, 12:00

Last modification: November 23, 2022, 12:02 p.m.

One of the major reasons for the endless love for Suzuki Gixxers in the Bangladeshi market is its engine. The bike has a 155cc air-cooled twin-valve single-cylinder engine. It produces 14.6 horsepower at 8,000 rpm and 14 Nm of torque at 6,000 rpm.

This means the bike provides a low-end “torque” feel and allows you to get a quick adrenaline rush whenever you want it. The engine roars when driven aggressively, but is quiet enough not to bother you as you slowly weave your way through Dhaka traffic.

Gixxer’s lightweight design is also ideal for Dhaka traffic. It weighs around 135 kg, making it one of the lightest bikes in the commuter segment. This, combined with excellent weight distribution, makes the Gixxer one of the best-handling bikes.

The inclusion of the 140 section rear tire and 41mm front fork also makes it a great cornering bike. The Gixxer doesn’t care how much you lean into corners, as long as you have the correct tire pressure of course.

Plus, the bike’s small footprint allows you to cut corners and squeeze through empty spaces while commuting around town.

Dual outlet exhaust. Photos: Saikat Roy

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Dual outlet exhaust.  Photos: Saikat Roy

Dual outlet exhaust. Photos: Saikat Roy

Suzuki Gixxer is all about performance. In terms of mileage, the bike does not disappoint. We received an average mileage of 36 km/l in Dhaka city. On the highway, the Gixxer averaged around 40km/l, which is a good number since we were also busy checking its limits, and let’s just say we forgot to behave.

The bike looks good, rides fast and handles well. So why isn’t this the perfect bike? Well, it is, as long as you’re single. Although the bike has a comfortable seating position that is ideal for long trips and occasional highway trips, the passenger seat is lacking. Passengers don’t have the best experience as the backseat isn’t very soft or wide, and if you’re on the heavier side of the spectrum, there’s not much seat at all!

Overall, the Gixxer 155 offers great specs, even for today, and can still compete with the latest and greatest in today’s bike market. The styling is aggressive enough to meet the needs of young riders, has that Japanese DNA and Suzuki brand value. We definitely recommend the Gixxer to anyone looking into the 150-165cc commuter bike market.

The three shades of the Classic Matt series. Photos: Saikat Roy

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The three shades of the Classic Matt series.  Photos: Saikat Roy

The three shades of the Classic Matt series. Photos: Saikat Roy

Pricing starts at Tk 1,99,950 for regular monochrome models in Classic Matt hues. The Gixxer 155 is available at dealerships across the country.

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Chronicle Archives – Cycle News https://www.labougeotte.org/chronicle-archives-cycle-news/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 20:00:10 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/chronicle-archives-cycle-news/ larry laurent | November 20, 2022 Cycle news Archives COLUMN Vance & Hines Suzuki, Top Fuel’s Legendary Beast Racer Terry Vance had plenty of experience on super-fast drag racing bikes, he had just completed several racing seasons with a twin-engine Honda that dominated the Top Gas class. But nothing prepared him for the rush of […]]]>

larry laurent | November 20, 2022

Cycle news Archives

COLUMN

Vance & Hines Suzuki, Top Fuel’s Legendary Beast

Racer Terry Vance had plenty of experience on super-fast drag racing bikes, he had just completed several racing seasons with a twin-engine Honda that dominated the Top Gas class. But nothing prepared him for the rush of sensory overload when he first twisted the throttle on the supercharged, nitromethane-burning Suzuki Top Fuel machine his racing partner Byron Hines built.

Terry Vance on the nitromethane supercharged Suzuki Top Fuel machine his racing partner Byron Hines built. Photo: NHRA

Although Vance scored victories, championships and records, including the first motorcycle to break the 200 mph barrier and run in all six, riding the massive supercharged V&H Suzuki was no walk in the park. He now admits, despite its success and the huge fan attention it garnered, the famous wedge-shaped drag bike intimidated him every time he threw a leg over it. In the end, Vance & Hines sold their famed Top Fuel to fellow drag racing legend, Larry McBride. The reasons weren’t just that Vance never felt comfortable piloting the machine, but because their business was growing so fast that they no longer had time to focus on what was small. -to be the longest and most expensive motorcycle the company has ever built. But while it lasted, the Vance & Hines Suzuki Top Fuel bike was one of the true marvels of all drag racing and an experience Vance says he will never forget.

If you’ve seen the documentary about the extensive testing the Air Force underwent before test pilot Chuck Yeager finally broke the sound barrier, you’ve got an idea of ​​the methodical testing Vance and Hines underwent even before they left. compete with their Suzuki Top Fuel machine. The idea of ​​the best tanker started before Vance & Hines when Terry and Byron worked for Russ Collins and his company RC Engineering.

“We had a twin-motor Top Gas bike that won 22 out of 23 races in two years,” Vance recalled. “We kind of demoralized the competition in the class. We really didn’t like the fact that we were doing all that gain and not getting any exposure. With Fuel bikes, all they had to do was show up and that was a big deal. So we decided to build a Top Fuel bike.

In 1977, Hines began building the Top Fuel machine. It was originally supposed to be powered by a Kawasaki KZ900 engine, but then Suzuki stepped in with the sponsorship, so Bryon went ahead with the build using a Suzuki GS1000-based engine. At the end of the year, Vance took his first runs on the bike and found it almost completely unusable. Since he had so much experience riding mega-powered drag racers, including the twin-engine Honda Top Gas, one might wonder why the Top Fuel Suzuki was such a big step. Vance just laughed when asked.

Terry Vance and Byron Hines
Drag Racing winning duo Terry Vance (left) and Byron Hines. Photo: NHRA

“Comparing this twin-engine Honda to the Suzuki Top Fuel bike is like comparing a lamb to a lion,” Vance said. “It was so drastically different that I had trouble understanding. It was like you were going at lightning speed.

“The Fuel bike would shake the [rear] the tires were so bad you couldn’t see the track, everything was blurry,” Vance recalled. “You’d get to the middle of the track and the front wheel wouldn’t touch the ground and you’d just be on the wheel bar on the rear wheel, and you’d think, ‘Man, I’m really haulin’ ass.’ When the [rear] the tire would stop shaking and everything would become crystal clear and you could look over the bar and use it as a visual gauge. It was almost as if a camera went out of focus and then went into focus. You would know when you were on a really good run how quickly that clarity would come to your vision.

All of this building and testing coincided with Terry and Byron’s decision to leave RC Engineering and strike out on their own to start Vance & Hines, so there was a lot going on.

On top of that, Hines was trying new concepts on the Fueler, including a fixed rear axle and a rear fender. The unexpected result was a bike that wouldn’t go straight to the track. It took a year of testing, tweaking and re-testing before the boys had a bike they believed would confidently reach the end of the quarter mile without hitting the wall. The key was getting the Tracy body shape, weight and width, to allow the aerodynamics to guide the bike right through the center of the drag lane. Hines also modified the fixed axle to be adjustable so the bike steers better. In 1980 Suzuki released their GS1100 and the team switched to this engine with its four-valve heads. The bike was constantly losing cranks due to weak aluminum crankcases. Suzuki provided the answer with cast iron cases.

“They [iron cases] were 45 pounds heavier than what we had before,” Hines recalled. “But they were bulletproof, so in late 1980 or early 1981 we started using them.”

Suzuki Vance and Hines Top Fuel Bike
Vance said comparing the twin-engine Honda to the Suzuki Top Fuel motorcycle at the time was like comparing a lamb to a lion. Photo: NHRA

After Russ Collins set the top speed bar in 1978 with his 199.55 mph run, the holy grail of Top Fuel motorcycle racing in the early 1980s broke the 200 mph barrier and entered the elapsed time of six seconds. All the big names were trying to make it happen, including living legends like Russ Collins, Elmer Trett and Bo O’Brochta to name a few.

Vance, on the Vance & Hines Suzuki Top Fueler, became the first to hit the targets, but it’s not without controversy. It happened on a Wednesday night, August 4, 1982, at Orange County International Raceway. During testing, Vance had an impressive run and fired the lights with a pass in 6.98 seconds at 203.61 mph. They accomplished the feat even though the crankshaft broke during the passage. The controversy was whether the race should even have been considered legitimate. It didn’t happen at a national event, but at a regular weekly Orange County Wednesday meet, which primarily drew locals to race their street machines. Locals would sometimes get a big treat when some of Top Fuel’s teams showed up and used the weekly meet as a low-cost proving ground. But since Vance’s 200+ mph run was not in a nationally sanctioned competition, the record was largely ignored.

“There’s always been a debate about who ran the first 200 mph race in six seconds, and I’m not even interested in that,” Vance said. “It was a national track with top notch timing equipment, a regular weekly meet and everyone saw it so no one could deny that. All I can say is it was a real man machine; I don’t know any other way to say it. If you didn’t have experience on other race bikes, you could never handle it. You couldn’t just put someone “One on a Fuel bike, it would kill itself. It was the top of the food chain in terms of power. You had to have a few screws loose to mount one in the first place.

A year after Vance’s 200-plus run, Elmer Trett was officially recognized as the first to break the legendary 200 mph barrier when he did so at the 1983 NHRA US Nationals in Indianapolis, in the half- final against O’Brochta. Trett and Vance met in the finals at Indy, setting up the perfect scenario between the two top guns. Vance made it light and got off to a great start and had a lead, but blew his engine during the shift, giving Trett the win.

Vance finally decided to quit riding the top fuel V&H Suzuki when Vance found he couldn’t control the direction of the bike in crosswinds.

“The problem was that we were pushing the limits without the benefit of a wind tunnel,” Vance said. “Today would have been the first place we would have tested.

“At that time, I was ready to work on making Pro Stock more popular, and I was afraid that the Fuel bike would continue to present challenges that we might not be able to meet. So, I finally told Byron that I wasn’t going to ride him anymore.

Vance & Hines Suzuki Top Fuel Record

Today Vance looks back and can now smile both at the fame this machine gave him, and at the aspect of riding such a powerful, impressive and difficult-to-handle machine and living to tell the tale. .

“Even though we only rode the Fuel bike for about four years, it got us as much or more notoriety than the Pro Stock thing,” Vance said. “People really liked the bike. They liked its somewhat futuristic appearance, and it was a great ambassador for the Suzuki brand. If I walk into a room or someone introduces me, the first thing people say is, “Oh man, I saw you riding that Fuel bike.” It was great!’ They always remember this bike, and it always had a special place in my heart.

Larry McBride bought the Vance & Hines Top Fuel Suzuki, rebranded it and campaigned it for several years before crashing the bike heavily in the early 90s and being seriously injured in the process. The bike was damaged in the crash, but McBride still has it.

“Hopefully the bike will be restored at some point,” McBride said. “But I’m still running actively and it takes up all my time. But one day we will bring it back.

Vance would like to see the machine restored.

“I should just call Larry and give him a lot of money to rebuild it,” Vance said. “It would be great to reunite with one of the most recognizable machines in drag racing history.” NC

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Suzuki announces pricing for the advent of the 2023 V-Strom 1050DE… https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-announces-pricing-for-the-advent-of-the-2023-v-strom-1050de/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 15:35:40 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-announces-pricing-for-the-advent-of-the-2023-v-strom-1050de/ THE adventure motorcycle sector gains a new oldie in the form of the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE. The bike continues the V-Strom theme for this year, now with added off-road capability! This article was originally published on September 5, 2022, but was updated on November 17, 2022 with pricing information for the V-Strom 1050 2023 […]]]>

THE adventure motorcycle sector gains a new oldie in the form of the 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050DE. The bike continues the V-Strom theme for this year, now with added off-road capability!

This article was originally published on September 5, 2022, but was updated on November 17, 2022 with pricing information for the V-Strom 1050 2023 and V-Strom 1050DE 2023.

Outwardly looking much the same as the previous generation Suzuki V-Strom 1050, most of the updates for the 2023 DE version focus on the electronics and suspension of the newly announced machine. Much of the work done is to bolster the bike’s off-road capability, with tweaks to the suspension, chassis and electronics to achieve this.

First, the new DE features more suspension travel in the front (170mm instead of 160mm) and rear (169mm instead of 160mm). The extra travel also helped increase the bike’s ground clearance, taking the bike from 165mm in stock trim to 190mm in this new DE guise. The new bike now also gets an additional Gravel traction control setting, bringing the total count to four and off, and it also gives riders the option to turn off the machine’s rear ABS completely.

The bike’s frame is also revised, with the DE’s seat losing its fit and gaining steel footpegs over the standard bike’s aluminum ones. It also gains a more off-road oriented 21-inch front wheel, which should make the V-Strom a much more dirt-crushing machine. A quickshifter is standard equipment on the DE, along with an aluminum skid plate, engine bars and a wider 40mm tapered handlebar.

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Vance & Hines/Mission Suzuki team ends 2022 NHRA Pro Stock Moto season with top qualifying spot in Pomona https://www.labougeotte.org/vance-hines-mission-suzuki-team-ends-2022-nhra-pro-stock-moto-season-with-top-qualifying-spot-in-pomona/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 21:25:21 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/vance-hines-mission-suzuki-team-ends-2022-nhra-pro-stock-moto-season-with-top-qualifying-spot-in-pomona/ Angelle Sampey sets new Pro Stock motorcycle track record atAuto Club Raceway BREA, Calif. – Nov. 14, 2022 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Flaunting the speed that has made them a season-long championship contender, the Vance & Hines/Mission Suzuki Pro Stock Motorcycle team has lifted the curtain on the 2022 NHRA season with his seventh […]]]>

Angelle Sampey sets new Pro Stock motorcycle track record at
Auto Club Raceway

BREA, Calif. – Nov. 14, 2022 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Flaunting the speed that has made them a season-long championship contender, the Vance & Hines/Mission Suzuki Pro Stock Motorcycle team has lifted the curtain on the 2022 NHRA season with his seventh number one qualifying performance of the year, but was unable to make it past the second round of eliminations at the NHRA Auto Club Finals at Auto Club Raceway in Pomona, Calif. sunday.

With a total of 13 Pro Stock Motorcycle Championships and over 150 NHRA National event wins between riders Angelle Sampey and Eddie Krawiec and crew chief Andrew Hines, himself a six-time rider’s champion, the team Vance & Hines/Mission Suzuki brought decades of winning experience to the starting line in its first season under Suzuki sponsorship. The team entered the season with high expectations, but struggled to deliver consistent results in an up-and-down season, picking up just one win during the campaign. The team have already set their eyes on the second year of the relationship with renewed expectations.

Consistently owning the fastest bike on the field, Sampey took the top qualifying spot on his Suzuki Hayabusa for the sixth time in 15 races this year. His burst of 6.703 seconds / 201.61 mph on Friday reset the Pro Stock Motorcycle track record at legendary Auto Club Raceway, which has hosted the NHRA Finals since 1984. It was the 59th best qualifying performance for the triple class champion, who with 46 career wins is the winningest runner in NHRA history.

Angelle Sampey (2) ends the 2022 season with her 59th qualifying spot

Angelle Sampey (2) ends the 2022 season with her 59th qualifying spot and sets a new track record at Pomona.

Sampey got a free run in the first round of eliminations against non-starting Katie Justice, running a 6.829 seconds / 192.17 mph pass to advance automatically. But in a repeat of the start-line woes that plagued her for much of the season, Sampey lost on lap two on a red-light fault despite running 6.732 seconds / 202.18 mph that would easily have covered the 7.126 seconds / Race at 152.80 mph.

“I had the best bike on the circuit all year, and for some reason, which was my fault pretty much all the time, I didn’t win more races. very disappointing end to the season. I was hoping to turn things around and finish the last race on a high. I had the bike to do it again,” said Sampey, whose season highlight was the team’s only win at the Summit Racing Equipment NHRA Nationals in Norwalk, Ohio, in June “I don’t know what’s happened to me mentally for the last half of the season, but there’s nothing I can do about it. change it now. I am very grateful for the opportunity given to me to ride such an incredible machine. My team is amazing. They did a great job and I couldn’t be more proud of them. I just wish I could give them a better performance. I’m glad I got number one qualifying and a win, but it should have been so much more and it’s all my fault. As for next year, I don’t know what’s going to happen yet, so I can’t really comment on that.

Compounding the team’s disappointment at Pomona, Eddie Krawiec suffered a series of frustrating electrical issues during qualifying which resulted in his first failure to qualify for an NHRA national event since the 2007 season. disappointing for the four-time Pro Stock Motorcycle champion, who was the top qualifier at the Norwalk race but failed to win a race for the first time since 2009.

Eddie Krawiec (4)

After a difficult 2022 season, Eddie Krawiec (4) is putting this season behind him and remains optimistic for the 2023 season.

“My bike picked up an electric gremlin and we struggled all weekend trying to find it. By the fourth qualifying session we had changed all the electrical parts on the bike and even changed the motors. was a struggle and it wasn’t for lack of effort, but I’m ending the season on a low note. It’s the first time in 15 years that I haven’t raced on Sunday. But we’ll work things out, test in the winter off-season and be more determined than ever to come back and fight for a championship,” said Krawiec, who looked to the 2023 season with optimism. “Overall, this race does not reflect the overall season that I had, which was good. It’s been a year of generating data and better understanding how the bike rides. We didn’t expect to set the world on fire, but we expected to be a little better. Next year will be very innovative for the Suzuki teams, and it’s great to have contributed to that. So I’m excited to come back and race for the championship.

Crew chief Andrew Hines put the tough race weekend behind him and looked forward to spending the offseason focusing on new research and development projects that will advance the performance of the Vance & Hines Suzuki program to a even higher level.

“We fell into a bad spot here at Pomona, but we showed we can be strong up front. Seven number one qualifiers is no small feat. Our performance is better at the end of the season than she wasn’t at first,” Hines said. “This year I’ve learned a lot by being out of the seat, where I need to focus my efforts and that’s made me a better all-around team leader. I’m excited for what the future holds for Suzuki and Vance & Hines. We’re going to come out strong and fast and make sure those Hayabusas are ahead of the pack again.

At the end of the 2022 NHRA season, Sampey and Krawiec finished sixth and seventh in the final 2022 Pro Stock Motorcycle Championship standings with 2,353 and 2,306 points, respectively.

The Vance & Hines/Mission Suzuki team will return to competition in 2023 when the Pro Stock Motorcycle class opens its season March 9-12 at the Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals at Gainesville Raceway in Gainesville, Florida.

For the latest Suzuki Team news, race reports and information, visit SuzukiCycles.com/Racing/Drag-Racing.

About Suzuki

Suzuki Motor USA, LLC. (SMO) distributes motorcycles, ATVs, scooters, auto parts, accessories, and ECSTAR oils and chemicals through an extensive dealer network in 49 states. Suzuki Motor Corporation (SMC), based in Hamamatsu, Japan, is a diversified global manufacturer of motorcycles, ATVs, scooters, automobiles, outboard motors and related products. Founded in 1909 and incorporated in 1920, SMC has business relationships with 201 countries/regions. For more information, visit www.suzukicycles.com.

About Vance & Hines

The Vance & Hines brand has always been about enhancing the exhilaration of motorcycle riding. It all started over 40 years ago when Terry Vance and Byron Hines were two young enthusiasts of the burgeoning Southern California motorcycle racing scene. Terry always wanted to go faster and Byron knew how to make it happen. Before long, their track success and innovation caught the attention of other racers, riders and motorcycle manufacturers, which ultimately translated into commercial demand for their products and services. Today, the mission and activity of the Society are the same; make bikes go faster on the race track and leverage those learnings to create impactful products for riders everywhere. Since the company’s inception in 1979, it has run factory racing programs in partnership with Suzuki, Yamaha, Ducati and Harley-Davidson in drag racing, road racing and flat track. Vance & Hines is based in Santa Fe Springs CA and has its Racing Development Center in Brownsburg IN. To learn more about the company’s history and products, visit www.vanceandhines.com.

Source: Suzuki Motor USA, LLC

Suzuki logo

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MotoGP Valencia subscriber notes part 2: Hot tarmac, the sad loss of Suzuki, electronic oddity and frustration for Aprilia and Honda | MotoMatters.com https://www.labougeotte.org/motogp-valencia-subscriber-notes-part-2-hot-tarmac-the-sad-loss-of-suzuki-electronic-oddity-and-frustration-for-aprilia-and-honda-motomatters-com/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 23:37:48 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/motogp-valencia-subscriber-notes-part-2-hot-tarmac-the-sad-loss-of-suzuki-electronic-oddity-and-frustration-for-aprilia-and-honda-motomatters-com/ Heading into the last MotoGP race of the year in Valencia, we were all expecting Ducati to dominate. After all, they had totally dominated the 2022 season. Ducati had won 12 of the 19 races so far (7 by Pecco Bagnaia), had at least one rider on the podium for 25 consecutive races, taken 15 […]]]>

Heading into the last MotoGP race of the year in Valencia, we were all expecting Ducati to dominate. After all, they had totally dominated the 2022 season. Ducati had won 12 of the 19 races so far (7 by Pecco Bagnaia), had at least one rider on the podium for 25 consecutive races, taken 15 pole positions and had at least a driver in the front row for 39 races. In 2021, Ducati had locked both the front row of the grid and the podium at Valencia.

After qualifying, Ducati had increased its pole tally to 16 in 2022 and extended its streak of consecutive first-row starts to 40. Jorge Martin started from pole and Jack Miller qualified third. But that something had changed was clear from the rest of the grid. Marc Marquez was second on the Repsol Honda – an in-form Marquez can use his genius to pull a quick lap out of the bag, but the Honda can’t keep him going for race distance – while second row was made up of Fabio Quartararo on the Yamaha, Alex Rins on the Suzuki and Maverick Viñales on the Aprilia. Valence no longer looked like a Ducati whitewash (redwash?).

What has changed between last year and this year? The answer is simply the weather. This is a recurring problem for Michelin: it is responsible for selecting the tire distribution for the 20 races in February, even before the start of the season. This forces them to try to anticipate weather conditions 8 or 9 months from now.

Long term forecast

To get an idea of ​​the magnitude of this task, imagine that in February you had to choose the clothes you will wear at each of the 20 races throughout the year, pack them in separate bags, and then open them at the ‘arrival. You might arrive in Valencia in November and worry that the sweater you brought will be too thick for the surprisingly warm weather. Or you might wish you had something warmer as you shiver in the freezing early morning temperatures. Rinse and repeat this for 20 strokes.

The problem in Valencia was that it was surprisingly hot. Air temperatures on Sunday reached 27°C, where a year earlier they struggled to reach 20°C. Track temperatures were 10°C or more warmer than last year. This year’s temperatures were way above what Michelin had covered.

This placed a lot of load on the tires, especially the front. Valencia is very asymmetrical and a place where bikes spend a huge amount of time on the tire side. It is also a place where you brake a lot by leaning. Turn 2 to Turn 3, Turn 6, 7, 8 and Turn 14 on the left side of the tire, Turn 5, 10, 11 on the right side. The left side of the forehead, especially, took a hammer blow.

That’s why the race ended up being so slow. Alex Rins’ winning race time was almost 6.8 seconds slower than Pecco Bagnaia’s winning time in 2021, and would have seen him finish sixth last year. It was a second and a half slower than his Suzuki teammate Joan Mir’s time in last year’s race, which took him to fourth place.

Front tire issues left Fabio Quartararo unable to keep pace with the leaders. “It was just a problem because the tire compound was too soft,” said the Monster Energy Yamaha rider. “And luckily this year we had at least one step harder on the left. But they bring way too soft tires on this track, and also I think because every year it gets hotter and hotter on this track, today it’s like 26° or 27°, that’s why we’re also a bit too soft, and we’re already using super hard tyres.”

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Suzuki Katana review, first ride https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-katana-review-first-ride/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 13:06:32 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-katana-review-first-ride/ Suzuki launched the iconic Katana in India which is a legend in its own right. But is it good enough to impress us? The Suzuki Katana may look retro, but it performs like any other modern liter-class motorcycle. By Rahul Ghosh: In the 1980s, wallpapers were still to be invented and ‘hot metal’ posters adorned […]]]>

Suzuki launched the iconic Katana in India which is a legend in its own right. But is it good enough to impress us?

The Suzuki Katana may look retro, but it performs like any other modern liter-class motorcycle.

By Rahul Ghosh: In the 1980s, wallpapers were still to be invented and ‘hot metal’ posters adorned the walls of our bedrooms. It was around this time that Suzuki launched the Katana. A motorcycle with a sharp look that immediately won over young enthusiasts. Back to the future and Suzuki has launched the 2022 iteration of the Katana in India much to the frenzy of us old school devotees. So is the Katana a motorcycle that deserves to be taken out of the realm of the poster or is it about never meeting their hero?

The Suzuki Katana has gotten smoother over the years but not much sharper.

Suzuki Katana: design details

The Suzuki Katana is therefore unquestionably a Katana! By this we mean that the designers made sure that the bike’s iconic silhouette was retained. Simply put, the bike has gotten smoother over the years, but not much sharper. The square headlight has been retained, but inside is LED lighting technology. This is also the case for position lights and unique indicators. The front is dominated by those 17-inch alloys which are painted bright orange. 41mm adjustable forks and short fender complete the unique front end design.

The LCD dashboard offers tons of data but isn’t easy to read.

The dashboard, meanwhile, is an all-LCD affair. A lot of information is transmitted to the pilot but the display is not very readable. It’s more like a dot-matrix printer in the laser world! The switchgear is easy to use and one can sift through all five levels of traction control and three driving maps on the go using it. In profile, we can see the gas tank which looks rather bulky. However, in reality, it can hold 12 liters of fuel, which also means frequent fuel stops given that the Katana is a liter class motorcycle. The saddle is perched at 825mm, meaning even shorter riders will be able to mount a horse with ease. The riding position is also comfortable and the handlebars are raised and fall easily into the hand. The position of the footpegs is rather neutral, which means that the rider’s triangle is designed to allow for long rides. The short rear section looks cool and the LED taillight completes the design package.

The 999cc engine offers excellent performance at all levels. There are several driving maps that dampen throttle response.

Suzuki Katana: Engine, gearbox

As for the mechanics, let’s say the Katana is powered by a 999cc liquid-cooled engine that’s basically a decade and a half old. However, it has undergone a complete overhaul and gets a whole host of upgrades including new cam profiles, new valve springs, electronic throttle bodies, a new clutch and a new exhaust system. Power has also increased from 150 hp to 152 hp. The Katana also benefits from five levels of traction control and three motor maps, which is surely something much needed on a bike in its class. A 6-speed manual gearbox sends power to the rear wheel.

The rear indicators are mounted on the fender. The seat is large and allows space to move around.

Suzuki Katana: performance

Swing one leg and the Katana is very comfortable. The engine comes alive with the typical four-cylinder throb and the clutch is light and the gearbox smooth. Acceleration is much reduced as the bike takes off. This is the case when selecting the two more docile driving maps that dampen throttle response for everyday use. Navigating the streets of the city, it will be difficult to realize that this is a fat bike to ride. The engine remains calm under the 3,500 rpm mark and the Katana sails happily at 50 km/h in 5e equipment. This is where the bike’s 217kg curb weight is felt and it’s also not very maneuverable in traffic thanks to the heavy steering.

But the fun begins when the road opens up and the driver switches to mode A on the driving map. Throttle response stiffens and acceleration becomes ballistic. Past the 3,500 to 4,000 rpm mark, the engine note changes radically and we realize that the Katana is ready to go to war. It picks up speed quickly and 100 km/h is no big deal as the speedo easily exceeds the 140 km/h mark. The engine feels happy as it easily hits the redline numbers which are around 11,000 rpm. It will also be adept at sending heaps of congratulations to the designers. God knows what voodoo they did, but even at high speeds there is literally no tremor felt. It also helps to trust the rider to go fast. Needless to say, the Katana stays planted in the road as you chase the horizon. Another game changer on the Katana is the traction control system. The five levels of it provide a wide safety net and that inspires confidence on wet surfaces.

Suzuki Katana: Handling

When it comes to maneuverability, the Katana isn’t as smooth as its cousins. You feel the weight at low speeds and the bike isn’t very flickable in traffic. In turns too, the Katana feels a bit stiff and doesn’t like to dance much unless pushed. But what will really improve the Katana is a new set of stickier tires. This should improve the confidence one needs when cornering and especially on wet roads. When it comes to ride quality, the Katana surely impressed. With the first round of heavy rain hitting the NCR, the roads experienced an overflow of the top layer. In these conditions, the ride quality felt pretty good, and the suspension soaked up those potholes and bumpy roads with ease. Last but not least, the Katana offers a generous 140mm of ground clearance. While that might not seem like much, especially when you spot the low-slung exhaust pipes, it’s certainly capable of tackling the nasty speed bumps found on Indian roads.

The Katana’s braking service is provided by dual 310mm discs from Brembo up front and a single 220mm disc from Nissin. The brakes offer good front-end bite and do a magnificent job of bringing the bike down at a brisk speed. The same goes for the rear brakes. ABS works well and doesn’t feel very intrusive.

Suzuki Katana: Verdict

The Suzuki Katana is one of those motorcycles that we want more than we need! But the Katana also makes a solid case for itself. It looks just amazing and especially in this matte blue shade. It offers a very comfortable driving position that allows you to ride for long hours. The motor is smooth and delivers excellent mid-range and top-end performance. The ride quality is also excellent and well suited to Indian conditions. At Rs 13.61 lakh, the Katana sits in the middle of its competitors. The downsides, on the other hand, include an old-fashioned LCD dashboard and tires that definitely need an upgrade. So to answer the question posed at the very beginning, the Katana deserves to be freed from the kingdom of the poster and released on the roads.

Technical specifications: Suzuki Katana

999cc, four-cylinder, liquid-cooled engine

Power 152 hp at 1,100 rpm

Maximum torque 106 Nm at 9,250 rpm

6-speed gearbox

LxWxH 2,130x820x1,100 mm

Wheelbase 1460mm

Empty weight 217 kg

Fuel capacity 12 liters

Price: 13.61 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi)

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Suzuki GSX 125 installment plan without markup https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-gsx-125-installment-plan-without-markup/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 13:58:23 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-gsx-125-installment-plan-without-markup/ Pak Suzuki Motor Company (PSMC) has announced a Suzuki GSX 125 Installment Plan with 0% interest (margin), which could be due to the high price, as many other options are offered by the competition at much lower prices, including the Yamaha YBR 125, Honda CB 125F and even the Honda CB 150F, which is cheaper […]]]>

Pak Suzuki Motor Company (PSMC) has announced a Suzuki GSX 125 Installment Plan with 0% interest (margin), which could be due to the high price, as many other options are offered by the competition at much lower prices, including the Yamaha YBR 125, Honda CB 125F and even the Honda CB 150F, which is cheaper despite being 150cc.

Suzuki GSX 125 installment plan without markup

The company launched the Suzuki GSX 125 on Friday and the bike comes as a replacement for its predecessor, the Suzuki GS 150SE, which ended up being discontinued by Pak Suzuki Motor Company (PSMC) a few months despite huge customer demand.

However, PSMC released a Suzuki GSX 125 Installment Plan with 0% markup, which means people can consider buying the newly launched motorcycle without worrying about paying interest to the company. According to the details, the company offered 1 installment plan with ’24 easy monthly payments’ and the details are explained in the post below.

Suzuki GSX 125 Installment Plan

Price Rs.359,000
Deposit (30%) Rs.107,700
Monthly payment Rs.10,500
Last installment Rs. 9,800

It is pertinent to mention that Pak Suzuki Motor Company (PSMC) offers some of the best installment plans for its motorcycles compared to the competition which only offers such offers to certain credit card holders and with very low monthly installments , which might not be feasible for many. people.

Read more: 2022 Suzuki Bikes Installment Plan.

Additionally, Pak Suzuki Motor Company (PSMC) has increased the prices of all motorcycles from November 1, 2022.

Read more: Latest Suzuki bike prices in Pakistan – November 2022.

Follow INCPAK on Facebook / Twitter / Instagram for updates.

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Top 10 motorcycles for a date https://www.labougeotte.org/top-10-motorcycles-for-a-date/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/top-10-motorcycles-for-a-date/ According to Hollywood, all cool guys ride motorcycles. He wears a leather jacket, jeans and boots. A spare helmet for his rider hangs on the back of the bike. Every woman wants to date him, which hopefully means taking a ride on the back of his motorcycle. Some bikes make two-up riding more comfortable. For […]]]>

According to Hollywood, all cool guys ride motorcycles. He wears a leather jacket, jeans and boots. A spare helmet for his rider hangs on the back of the bike. Every woman wants to date him, which hopefully means taking a ride on the back of his motorcycle. Some bikes make two-up riding more comfortable. For a date, you don’t need an oversized chest of drawers. Instead, you need a bike that’s nimble enough for city streets and big enough for two people. These 10 bikes are perfect for making a date and taking them around town.


TOPSPEED VIDEO OF THE DAY

10/10 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Stock studio image of a Royal Enfield Interceptor INT 650cc in Orange Crush RHS against a white background.

The Interceptor 650 is perfect for a date night as its large seat can easily accommodate two people. Because it’s long and flat, your passenger can snuggle in as close as they feel comfortable. This helps passengers who are new to motorcycles feel comfortable and confident. The riding position is more upright but still sporty, allowing the rider to comfortably cling to a passenger. There’s also a conveniently placed bar in the back for the passenger to grab. The classic style of this cafe racer is compact and easy to maneuver in traffic. It also makes it easier to find a parking space right in front.

9/10 Yamaha SR400

Stock studio image of a black 2018 Yamaha SR400 on a white background.

This svelte little 400 may be new, but it looks vintage. However, unlike true vintage bikes, the Yamaha SR4000 has electric fuel injection. However, Yamaha did not remove the starter. So you can bring the bike to life without having to operate a choke. Although a 400cc motor might not seem like a lot of power, this bike has plenty of power to keep up with traffic. Damping the ride is a soft suspension that smooths out bumps and potholes. While the seat could use more padding, it’s nice and tall. There is plenty of room for two people.

Related: 10 Different Types Of Bikes You Should Know About

8/10 Triumph Tiger Sport

Studio image of a red 2022 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Adventure Motorcycle facing left against a white background.

The Tiger Sport is a mid-weight sport touring bike, perfect for the daily commute. It is also perfect for a romantic date. From office to dinner, you and your passenger will feel comfortable. The wide handlebars and curved saddle put you in an ergonomic riding position. The seat is nice and wide, giving you plenty of room while being plush and supportive. By comparison, the taller passenger seat allows your date to see past you without leaning to the side and throwing you off balance. Combine that with the extra-long suspension, and you’ve got a smooth ride for you and your date.

7/10 BMW R1250GS

Studio image of a black and yellow 2020 BMW R 1250 GS on a white background.

If you’re the type of person who always wants the latest technology, then BMW is your motorcycle brand. The company is known for producing innovative motorcycles. Sitting on the R1250 GS feels a bit like being in a cockpit with large, clearly visible dials. The sleek handlebar curves toward you for an upright, comfortable riding position. Connect your smartphone to the integrated Bluetooth to follow turn-by-turn navigation or share a few songs with your passenger. This lets you communicate when you’re on the bike and heading to your destination. So sit back and enjoy the supple suspension that smooths out the bumpiest roads.

Related: 10 Reasons We Love The BMW R1250GS

6/10 Triumph Bonneville T120

Studio image of a blue 2021 Triumph Bonneville T120 facing left against a white background.

Step on this bike’s user-friendly cruise control and enjoy the ride with your date. The seat of the Triumph Bonneville T120 has extra padding, making it comfortable for you and your passenger. The lightweight design of the bike makes it easy to move through traffic. Extra low handlebar placement keeps your hands comfortable by preventing them from going numb. The shape of the fuel tank is nice on this bike, which makes it more comfortable to place your legs on either side. Unlike smaller bikes, the 1200cc engine has enough power to keep your partner’s heart racing and you.

5/10 Indian Roadmaster Dark Horse Motorcycles

Image of a red 2022 Indian Roadmaster on cobblestones in front of water and a bridge.

Not all date night bikes need to be small and nimble. The Roadmaster Dark Horse is big, powerful and responsible. It comes with Indian’s most powerful engine, the 1890cc Thunder Stroke engine. It’s the bike people imagine when they think of motorcycles. This bagger comes with all the standard features, batwing fairings, large bags and a protective windshield. Leave the luggage in the back, and your date will come closer to you as he wraps his arms around you to hold on. Alternatively, add the rear seat and bags, and your passenger has a full backrest that wraps securely around them.

Related: Top 10 Motorcycles Under $6,000

4/10 Ducati Scrambler

Studio image of a red 2021 Indian Roadmaster 2022 Ducati Scrambler Icon motorcycle facing right against a white background.

There are a few bikes that you can call beautiful, and this is one of them. It’s perfect for date night with its expert Italian design that makes the bike look fresh and modern instead of vintage and tired. Unlike other motorcycles in the Ducati range, this is one of the most affordable. That leaves you with plenty of money for date night. The scrambler style of this bike makes it nimble and fun to ride around town or in the countryside. The bold red of the fenders and tank with the long, sleek curves give this bike some much-needed sexiness you don’t often see with scramblers or cafe racers.

3/10 BMW K1600

Studio image of a silver 2021 BMW K1600 GT motorcycle facing left in front of a white background.

Despite being one of the bigger bikes on this list, the K1600 is an enjoyable ride. It is perfectly balanced, which facilitates the boarding of a passenger. The motor shifts smoothly, creating a nice ride for you and your date. Like any bike in the BMW lineup, this bike is packed with technology and features. Some make driving easier, while others increase comfort. Your rider will appreciate the contoured saddle and large rubber footpegs. Opt for the addition of luggage in the back and you have an ideal place to store your personal effects and your helmets.

Related: Top 10 American Motorcycle Brands in 2022

2/10 Harley-Davidson Nightster

Studio image of a red and black 2022 Harley Davidson Nightster motorcycle facing right against a white background.

The Nightster has all the attitude of the old-school motorcycle without the weighty heaviness of the typical Harley. Traditionalists will see much of the original Sportster in the design of this bike. However, it also takes important steps towards modern bicycle design. Both riders will have a blast on this bike as it leans into corners effortlessly. There are also several riding modes to choose from, which customize the performance of the bike to the current riding conditions. The riding position is very upright, with the knees at a 90 degree angle. Although this makes it easier for the passenger to hold on, there is some space between the rider and the passenger. For this reason, the passenger may feel a little insecure when perched on the small seat cushion.

1/10 Moto Guzzi V85TT

Studio image of a beige 2021 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Tavel motorcycle on a white background.

The Moto Guzzi V85TT may look like a rugged, tumbling adventure bike, but that doesn’t mean it can’t excel as a party bike. The large windshield is perfect for keeping you and your passenger clean and bug-free on the way to dinner. The seat design keeps you both securely in place as you change lanes and make turns. Then there is the elegant Italian style. The bike also looks great with the storage box side panniers. They are essential for transporting personal effects and storing your helmets when you arrive at your destination. You’ll also appreciate added features like three-stage heated grips and fog lights.

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10 best motorcycles between 600 and 750cc https://www.labougeotte.org/10-best-motorcycles-between-600-and-750cc/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/10-best-motorcycles-between-600-and-750cc/ Mid-weight bikes offer many benefits to all cyclists. They are lighter, have smaller displacements and are available with cheaper price tags. As a novice rider, these bikes are accessible, unlike the intimidating 1000cc superbikes and hyper naked variants. Related: Everything You Need To Know About The Updated 2023 Kawasaki Hypersport Lineup As a seasoned rider, […]]]>

Mid-weight bikes offer many benefits to all cyclists. They are lighter, have smaller displacements and are available with cheaper price tags. As a novice rider, these bikes are accessible, unlike the intimidating 1000cc superbikes and hyper naked variants.


Related: Everything You Need To Know About The Updated 2023 Kawasaki Hypersport Lineup

As a seasoned rider, these bikes can be fun to ride because you can easily push them to the limit. They make great road and trail bikes for all riders. In this list are 10 of the best bikes in the middleweight class.

10/10 Suzuki SV650

Although the competition usurps the SV650, it remains an excellent choice for those looking for exceptional performance on a budget. However, the advanced age of the SV650 is starting to show. Since Suzuki introduced the SV650 in 1999, it has been one of its best sellers.

Thank you for offering a great combination of low sticker price and good performance. The SV650 has a friendly character that makes its V-twin engine appealing to novice riders. It uses a 645cc liquid-cooled V-twin engine that has remained the same since the last update in 2016. The engine offers a modest 68.2hp and 42.9lb-ft of torque.

9/10 Kawasaki Z650/Ninja 650

When Kawasaki introduced the Z650 in 2017, it was a great edition in the middleweight motorcycle category. Over the years, sales within this class have increased, with several manufacturers entering the fray.

The Z650 is a mid-weight Kawasaki naked bike with the same underpinnings as the Ninja 650R. Both models offer cost-effective performance and a more convenient platform. They use a 649cc parallel-twin engine that produces 58 hp and 42 lb-ft of torque while boosting low-end and mid-range power.

8/10 Suzuki GSX-S750

The GSX-S750 offers a blend of performance and an ergonomic chassis. It’s a naked sports bike that easily grabs attention with its aggressive looks. For the 2022 model year, the GSX-S750 receives a metallic matte black body complete with blacked out chassis components, wheels and engine.

Like most Suzuki naked bikes, the GSX-S750 offers a comfortable riding posture, solid performance and aggressive styling at a reasonable price. The GSX-S750 uses a 749cc liquid-cooled four-cylinder engine that uses the GSX-R architecture to deliver a torque-rich sport bike experience.

7/10 Kawasaki Vulcan S

The Vulcan S is an outlier in the cruiser market. It offers a mix of classic and sporty styling and adjustability to suit all riders. Kawasaki offers three versions of the Vulcan, including the base S, S ABS and S Café.

All of these models use the same 649cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine. They also offer an Ergo-Fit system that allows up to 18 adjustments by moving the handlebars, seat, and footpegs to different positions. Either way, the Vulcan S delivers a modern ride thanks to the retuned Ninja 650 R powertrain.

Related: 2022 Kawasaki Z650RS review: Retro meets modern in a near-perfect package

6/10 Yamaha MT-07/R7

Over the years, the MT-07 has received nice touches in terms of its brakes, ergonomics, engine and aesthetics. These upgrades help it be ready for any market while providing a great driving experience. Even though it keeps the same frame and suspension setup, it gets slightly larger front discs.

The MT-07 and R7 use the legendary CP2 689cc liquid-cooled engine producing 74 hp and 49.4 lb-ft of torque. In most cases, the R7 is an MT-07 with fairings. It’s a motorcycle for everyone and it proves that you never need a lot of technology and power to have fun on a bike.

5/10 Honda CB650R

With the middleweight segment growing daily, the CB650 R aims to beat its competition with a cranky inline-four engine. The CB650 R offers an upgraded Showa split-function suspension that delivers a firm yet sporty ride quality.

The CB650 R bridges the gap between small-engine and big-engine entry-level bikes. It’s an accessible bike that provides a gateway for novice riders while delivering affordable performance for seasoned riders. That’s thanks to its 649cc liquid-cooled inline-four that produces 81.9 hp and 42.97 lb-ft of torque.

Related: This is what we love about the Honda CB 500 X

4/10 Trident Triumph

The Trident features Triumph’s exciting triple engine and state-of-the-art technology at an incredibly competitive price. The 660cc triple engine produces 81 hp and 47 lb-ft of torque. This allows the Trident to deliver the perfect balance of exhilarating peak power and low-end torque.

Even though the Trident’s power is modest, it’s a breath of fresh air. It’s a character bike ideal for daily commuting and aggressive riding. The Trident is an accessible motorcycle suitable for both beginners and experienced riders.

3/10 Aprilia Tuono/RS 660

Aprilia’s middleweight class offers exceptional handling, engine character and performance in a crisp, clean form. The Tuono and RS 660 are more affordable variants of their bigger brothers, the Tuono and RSV4. Unlike the larger siblings, the Tuono and RS 660 use a 659cc parallel-twin engine.

The main difference between these two bikes is the bodywork. The Tuono 660 offers more upright ergonomics, different fork offset and shorter final drive than the RS 660. Both models offer smooth, linear delivery, making them accessible and fun to ride for novices and experts alike. .

Related: A look back at 30 years of Aprilia lighting up the race tracks

2/10 Yamaha Tenere 700

Since its launch in 2020, the T7 has become one of the most economical motorcycles on the market. Instead of following the competition and offering more electronics and bigger motors, the T7 is the exact opposite. It’s a simple and reliable motorcycle with everything you could possibly need.

The T7 is the ideal adventure bike for anyone who needs a torquey engine, great power-to-weight ratio and supple suspension. Weighing only 452 lbs, the T7 is easier to maneuver than most of its competitors. The best part of the T7 is its 689cc CP2 engine that delivers linear torque in response to throttle input.

1/10 Aprilia Touareg 660

Even though the Touareg uses the same 659cc parallel-twin engine as the Tuono and RS 660, there are a few changes. These include different camshafts used to decrease lift. The camshafts also help deliver power and torque sooner to suit all adventure riders.

However, the basic architecture remains the same, with Aprilia claiming 80 horsepower and 52 lb-ft of torque from the Touareg. The Touareg offers four driving modes, Urban, Off-Road, Explorer and Individual. These modes get full power, but response varies, with Urban providing a muted response.

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MotoGP, Moto2 and Moto3 race bikes differ in these key ways https://www.labougeotte.org/motogp-moto2-and-moto3-race-bikes-differ-in-these-key-ways/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 20:09:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/motogp-moto2-and-moto3-race-bikes-differ-in-these-key-ways/ The best riders in the world do not arrive in MotoGP by accident. With only 24 places available on the Grand Prix grid, achieving a first class seat is no adventure for the meek. In the past, riders could access MotoGP through various routes, including the World Superbike Championship (WSBK) and the AMA Superbike Championship. […]]]>

The best riders in the world do not arrive in MotoGP by accident. With only 24 places available on the Grand Prix grid, achieving a first class seat is no adventure for the meek. In the past, riders could access MotoGP through various routes, including the World Superbike Championship (WSBK) and the AMA Superbike Championship.

These days most of the top talent moves up the Grand Prix ladder, progressing through Lightweight and Intermediate classes before competing in MotoGP. So what is the difference between Moto3, Moto2 and MotoGP motorcycles? In a word, Cut. Sure, weight and power increase with these swell measurements, but there’s more to the equation than the spec sheets suggest.

For example, a Moto3 race bike harnesses a 250cc, 60-hp, single-cylinder engine mated to a six-speed transmission. These stripped-down models may seem unremarkable by these measurements, but the category’s 335-pound minimum weight restriction (including the pilot) turns these pocket rockets into fully pinned missiles on sprawling Grand Prix circuits. For context, the Honda and KTM machines primarily compete for the series championship.

The Moto2 class is raising the stakes and specs with a 765cc inline triple produced by Triumph. A six-speed gearbox remains standard, but the highly tuned Speed ​​​​Triple mill produces 138 horsepower in Moto2 form. As Triumph only supplies the mid-class powertrain, organizers split the field according to chassis, with Kalex and Speed ​​Up/Boscoscuro teams and riders vying for Moto2 supremacy. Regardless of brand, all Moto2 race machines must weigh more than 478 pounds (weight includes rider).

When it’s time to step up to the next category, things go awry for the resort. Sure, MotoGP machines offer engines up to 1,000cc (inline-four or V4), over 250 horsepower and a minimum weight of 446 pounds (rider not included) on paper, but they’re much more complicated on the page. To manage all the forces exerted on the bike and the rider, Aprilia, Ducati, Honda, KTM, Suzuki and Yamaha have to develop advanced technologies.

The list includes aero fins, carbon brake systems, punch-through devices, seamless gearboxes and ride height devices. Yes, size may be the main difference between Moto3, Moto2 and MotoGP machines, but class one proves that with more power comes more trouble. Solving these problems usually leads to new advanced technologies, something that is only developed in MotoGP.

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