Suzuki bikes – La Bougeotte http://www.labougeotte.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 00:52:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.labougeotte.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Suzuki bikes – La Bougeotte http://www.labougeotte.org/ 32 32 From salaries to overruns, there is a lot of frustration… https://www.labougeotte.org/from-salaries-to-overruns-there-is-a-lot-of-frustration/ Tue, 24 May 2022 11:53:14 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/from-salaries-to-overruns-there-is-a-lot-of-frustration/ WHILE MotoGP is in a period of high parity, the championship is currently facing significant issues and riders in the series have expressed their concerns. After the French and Spanish Grands Prix, the difficulty of overtaking in MotoGP became particularly evident. Eight-time world GP champion Marc Marquez has called overtaking in MotoGP “almost impossible”, thanks […]]]>

WHILE MotoGP is in a period of high parity, the championship is currently facing significant issues and riders in the series have expressed their concerns.

After the French and Spanish Grands Prix, the difficulty of overtaking in MotoGP became particularly evident. Eight-time world GP champion Marc Marquez has called overtaking in MotoGP “almost impossible”, thanks to a combination of the aerodynamics the bikes now use, plus ride height devices (RHDs) introduced more recently.

This criticism of MotoGP overtaking – and therefore the quality of racing – also comes after it was revealed by Mat Oxley that MotoGP teams apply illegal tire pressures in races, while going unpunished.

Now, a Crash.net article has detailed riders’ criticism of the KymiRing, which is set to host the Finnish Grand Prix in July, and the situation regarding contracts and wages.

“Some riders are worried because the track is so small,” said Alex Rins. “Some guys say it’s only first, second, third gear. But it’s the same for everyone.” However, the KymiRing is passable, so “theoretically we’ll go,” according to Rins.

Cornering from first to third gear isn’t necessarily a safety risk, but overtaking on a circuit with a single long straight could be tricky, especially in the MotoGP class, and the race could suffer. Combined with front tire pressure, aero and right-hand drive issues, it doesn’t look so good for the KymiRing, which is not yet homologated.

Another concern of MotoGP riders at the moment is the fragility of their contracts. Alonso Lopez replaces Romano Fenati in the Speed ​​Up team from the French Grand Prix and, while the Spaniard was impressive and showed he deserved to be in the World Championship, the way Fenati has losing his race was concerning.

“But if you have a contract, the team [must respect] the contract,” Rins said of the Fenati-Speed ​​Up situation.

Lopez himself fell victim to an early contract termination ahead of the 2021 season, when he was replaced at MAX Racing Team Husqvarna by Adrian Fernandez despite Lopez himself having a contract in place.

The subject of riders’ wages is another concern raised in the Le Mans safety committee among riders, who fear that wages will decrease unreasonably.

“Also, someone was saying we need a minimum wage, because I don’t know what some riders take [pay]but it doesn’t look like much,” Rins said.

Ever since news of Suzuki’s planned withdrawal from MotoGP broke, the topic of rider pay has become a bigger talking point. Joan Mir’s manager Paco Sanchez has been quite vocal on the matter. “[Suzuki] made an initial offer that was worse than Joan’s rookie offer,” Sanchez said. “It was in Portimao. Then in Jerez they said ‘OK, we have thought, we will convince [Suzuki] Japan to keep your current [pay] Contract'”.

Suzuki riders aren’t the only ones struggling to find high-paying contracts. Aleix Espargaro was “sad” at the lack of progress he and Aprilia had been able to make on his contract renewal. The Spaniard had become Aprilia’s first MotoGP winner in Argentina, is now on a streak of three consecutive podiums and, after the French Grand Prix, is just four points behind Fabio Quartararo at the top of the World Championship MotoGP. But Aprilia, nonetheless, seems to be tightening its grip on its wallet when it comes to Espargaro, much the same way many other factories and teams apparently are doing, including those chasing now-out-of-contract Suzuki riders.

Paco Sanchez said:[Joan Mir] won’t ride here for zero or for those shitty contracts that now KTM, Ducati- all those factories offer their riders.

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2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally [A Report with 41 Photos] https://www.labougeotte.org/2022-quail-motorcycle-rally-a-report-with-41-photos/ Sun, 22 May 2022 19:09:59 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/2022-quail-motorcycle-rally-a-report-with-41-photos/ Best of Show. 1951Vincent Rapide. If you love motorcycle encounters and admiring all kinds of motorcycles, then The Quail Motorcycle Gathering is something I recommend you experience at least once. The venue is beautiful, as is the weather and the participants. The grand grassy forecourt of the Quail Lodge & Golf Club in Carmel, California […]]]>

Best of Show. 1951Vincent Rapide.

If you love motorcycle encounters and admiring all kinds of motorcycles, then The Quail Motorcycle Gathering is something I recommend you experience at least once. The venue is beautiful, as is the weather and the participants. The grand grassy forecourt of the Quail Lodge & Golf Club in Carmel, California has the ambiance one might find at the finest automobile concours d’elegances, but on this day you’ll see a cornucopia of many of the most desirable motorcycles in the world. when I last visited in 2016, attendance was up and the crowd at this 12th edition of the Gathering seemed to like what they saw.2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally: VintageThe 2022 Quail Motorcycle Gathering showcased a wide range of competitive classes including Harley-Davidson XR750, BMW/5 Series, Two-Stroke and Mini Bike. There were also hot rods and classic cars on display. The motorcycles on display are probably the most diverse assortment of two-wheelers in the world. For example, Steve McQueen’s Excelsior Super X factory rider was presented in a plexiglass case. Not far away was a mostly carbon-fiber 800-hp Hayabusa-powered dragster that couldn’t be driven until the manufacturer provided a traction control system to, presumably, keep the rider alive. McQueen’s Von Dutch-painted mini-bike was nearby, along with an assortment of oddities you won’t see anywhere but on the grass at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering.2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally: Vintage RacesOne section contained collections of bikes from owners who brought their fleets to show. Runners and rusters shared the venue, with a handful of unique pieces and customs that might make you dizzy in the thin air. Moving on, I found just about every drool-worthy Ducati with Moto Guzzi, Laverda, Lambretta, MV Agusta and Bimota.2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally: ClassicAmerican brands were on full display – Harley-Davidsons, Indians and a handful of Hendersons – with spectacular restoration not far from wonderfully rusted relics. BMWs were seen everywhere, with R11s leading the way and an assortment of Honda motorcycles – mostly six-cylinder CBXs.2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally: Roland SandsForgive me if I missed a few in this crazy and eclectic mix of motorcycle dreams. Oh, let’s not forget the Tuk Tuk that was supposed to make the scene. Additionally, Roland Sands held court as he was awarded the title of 2022 Sports Legend. A 1951 Vincent Rapide was named best in show this year.2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally: Revival Cycles DucatiRunners, helicopters, customs and cruisers were on hand to keep everyone happy. Do yourself a favor and add The Quail Motorcycle Gathering to your bucket list. You can thank me later.Photography by Steve Burton, Kevin-James Gonzales, Franco Gutierrez, Jonathan Handler and Kahn Media 2022 Quail Motorcycle Rally Top HonorsBest of Show: 1951Vincent Rapide; Max Hazan, CaliforniaThe spirit of The quail Award: 1984 Honda RS750; Chris Carter, CaliforniaHarley-Davidson XR750: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750; Terry Kaluza, CaliforniaBMW/5 Series: 1971BMW R75/5; Scott Wilmot, CaliforniaTwo-stroke “Braaaps”: 1986 Suzuki RG500gamma; Matt Torrens, Californiamini bikes | LOTS OF FUN: 1971 Montesa Cota 25; David Bookout, CaliforniaDesign and Style Award Presented by ARCH Moto: 1951Vincent Rapide; Max Hazan, Californiawhy we ride Presented by Why We Ride: Yamaha YSR50 1987; Kristen Skvorak, CaliforniaHagerty HVA Preservation Award: 1929 Excelsior-Henderson Super X 45ci OHV Factory Alcohol Burner; Jeffrey Thomas, WashingtonAMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Heritage Awards Presented by AMA: Fuse Ducati 2006; Rebirth Cycles, Texas

2022 Quail Motorcycle Gathering Photo Gallery

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2022 Pro Motocross 250 Class Preview Show https://www.labougeotte.org/2022-pro-motocross-250-class-preview-show/ Fri, 20 May 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/2022-pro-motocross-250-class-preview-show/ Maxxis International is committed to providing high performance tires to the world. Their products are of unmatched quality and performance. With over forty-five years of manufacturing experience and the ingenuity of their staff, they have created new technologies to develop their diverse tire products. Their products are thoroughly tested at their own facilities and at […]]]>

Maxxis International is committed to providing high performance tires to the world. Their products are of unmatched quality and performance. With over forty-five years of manufacturing experience and the ingenuity of their staff, they have created new technologies to develop their diverse tire products. Their products are thoroughly tested at their own facilities and at leading tire testing centers around the world. In addition, their engineers test their tires with their national and world champions.

Since 1998, FLY Racing has been committed to the relentless pursuit of improvement and innovation in motocross and off-road apparel. Check out FLYRacing.com to see the all new 2021 collection.

New Ray Toys has been creating cool toys and die-cast motorcycles/replicas since 1986.

We have branches in the United States, Hong Kong, France, Italy and Germany as well as specialized distributors around the world.

Here in the USA, New Ray Toys was one of the first manufacturers/distributors/licensees of diecast toys for the 6 major OEM’s and over the years have created the most popular diecast replica racing bikes Realistic Trucks, Transporter Racing Haulers, Stock Dirt Bikes, Sport Bikes, ATVs, UTVs, Snowmobiles and Scooters and distribute them to all major channels in our Powersports marketplace.

Check out the list of MX teams we’ve worked with past and present: Bud Racing, Honda/HRC Racing, Factory Connection Geico Honda, Makita Suzuki, Rockstar/Makita Suzuki, Two Two Motorsports/Honda/Kawasaki, RCH Suzuki, Moto XXX Hooters Racing, Yoshimura Suzuki, Monster Energy Pro Circuit Kawasaki, Monster Energy Kawasaki, San Manuel L&M Yamaha, Factory Yamaha, JGR Yamaha/Suzuki, Nitro Circus, Red Bull KTM, Rockstar Husqvarna.

DID brand drive chains and aluminum rims are all manufactured in Kaga, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, and supplied by motorcycle dealers around the world. Our top quality products are manufactured by skilled technicians, with a goal of perfection and to deliver exceptional performance for all cyclists. This focus on uncompromising quality has made DID the world’s leading supplier of original parts to Japanese and European motorcycle manufacturers.

Founded in 1979 and based in Southern California, Maxima is recognized as one of the most coveted brands in the running industry. Decades of active involvement in professional racing have led to powerful technology and a full line of market-leading products. The company continues its legacy by playing an active role in the sports and running communities. We strive to provide top quality for the recreational athlete or world champion.

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Dovizioso: Yamaha has become what Honda was https://www.labougeotte.org/dovizioso-yamaha-has-become-what-honda-was/ Wed, 18 May 2022 11:27:35 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/dovizioso-yamaha-has-become-what-honda-was/ WithU Yamaha MotoGP rider Andrea Dovizioso says the 2021 MotoGP championship-winning constructor has backed into a similar corner to the one Honda previously placed themselves in with Marc Marquez, where only one rider – the defending champion and 2022 championship leader Fabio Quartararo – is now able to successfully drive his M1. The three-time championship […]]]>

WithU Yamaha MotoGP rider Andrea Dovizioso says the 2021 MotoGP championship-winning constructor has backed into a similar corner to the one Honda previously placed themselves in with Marc Marquez, where only one rider – the defending champion and 2022 championship leader Fabio Quartararo – is now able to successfully drive his M1.

The three-time championship runner-up had a torrid start to the season as a Yamaha satellite rider, scoring just eight points in the first seven races of the year and finishing more than half of them outside the points – nowhere near his previous status as a championship contender with Ducati.

And the reason for that, he says, is simple: just like Honda, which built a bike that only suited Marquez’s strengths and punished his other riders, Yamaha built a machine perfectly suited to Quartararo’s riding style and other Yamaha riders. suffer the consequences.

“Yamaha are in a very good situation because they won last year, they are first in the championship this year, but in my opinion they are in a very similar situation to Marc and Honda for the last six years,” said explained Dovizioso. after finishing the French Grand Prix in 16th. “In a different way, because the bike is completely different, but that’s my opinion.

“I don’t know if Yamaha decided to come into this situation, but I think Honda decided to go in this direction because Marc [was dominant]. I don’t have the experience of the past four years. But the situation is similar – only one pilot is able to use the potential and make a huge gap from other pilots.

This isn’t meant to be a review of the machine, however. Undoubtedly very strong thanks to both an impressive 2021 campaign and a consistent if somewhat lackluster start to 2022 so far, this allows Quartararo to lead the title race.

And 15-time race winner Dovizioso (who is just one place ahead of rookie teammate Darryn Binder) says Quartararo’s success means Yamaha is still doing something right.

“The bike is really good in some areas because Fabio showed us that he can do amazing things,” explained Dovi, “but that’s the only way to be fast in my opinion with this bike. If you don’t ride that way, don’t do a lot of meters and don’t do a lot of speed in the middle of the turn, you can’t be fast.

“The bicycle, at the same speed as the other bicycles, does not accelerate. If you don’t speed through the middle of the corners, you can’t be fast. He [Quartararo] is really danceable on every trail, and that’s the only way to be fast with this bike.

And, perhaps worryingly for the Italian with two-thirds of the season remaining, he sees no easy solution to the problem they currently find themselves in beyond finding a way to completely rewrite his entire riding style to look more like Quartararo.

“At every track and with every setting we’ve tried, the gap is more or less the same,” he admitted, which is reflected in his race results this year.

980103

“It’s just another confirmation that the way you have to ride is too different. We tried to change a lot of things, that’s all we can do because we don’t have different hardware, but you don’t really affect it in a good or bad way.

“The only way is to change the microchip in your head, to ride the bike in a way, I don’t have that right now. I’m trying to change it but I haven’t found it yet, and this is the moment for which on each track more or less the gap is very similar, in terms of pace and on a best lap.

Thank you for your opinion!

What did you think of this story?

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Suzuki Emphasizes “Dedication and Commitment” to the U.S. Motorcycle Market https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-emphasizes-dedication-and-commitment-to-the-u-s-motorcycle-market/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:43:18 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-emphasizes-dedication-and-commitment-to-the-u-s-motorcycle-market/ After all but officially ending its MotoGP team, Suzuki told its US motorcycle dealers there was nothing to worry about – it’s here in the market to stay. The strand began in early May, when rumors of Suzuki’s MotoGP started circulating. Supposedly, Hamamatsu was unplugging the team, despite its strength and recent 2020 championship. Then, […]]]>

After all but officially ending its MotoGP team, Suzuki told its US motorcycle dealers there was nothing to worry about – it’s here in the market to stay.

The strand began in early May, when rumors of Suzuki’s MotoGP started circulating. Supposedly, Hamamatsu was unplugging the team, despite its strength and recent 2020 championship. Then, about a week later, MotoGP confirmed the story: Suzuki was negotiating an exit from the series. Confirmation of the rumor by MotoGP indicated that the deal was practically done and all that remained was to negotiate the terms of termination of the contract (Suzuki had committed to racing in MotoGP until 2026).

And then people started asking more questions. If Suzuki pulls out of MotoGP, what next? Was this a signal that the company might stop making motorcycles altogether? At least that might have been the end of full-size bikes? Suzuki hasn’t shown much innovation in the two-worlds space for a long, long time, and its ATV designs have been stagnating for years as well. If Suzuki wasn’t interested in pumping money into R&D for western market machines, maybe that indicated an exit plan?

Difficult news for Joan Mir and Alex Rins, Suzuki ending its MotoGP team, despite the success of recent years. Suzuki says it’s just a matter of balancing the budget. Photo: Suzuki

Both Cycle News and Revzilla are stories that tell This is not the case, according to an announcement from Suzuki. Revzilla says the announcement below was sent to Suzuki insiders; Cycle News also reports that some outlets got this version. ADVrider did not receive this release, so the text below is from the Cycle News report:

Suzuki Motor Corporation is actually considering leaving MotoGP at the end of 2022 and is negotiating with series organizer DORNA on an exit plan. This decision was made in light of the changing market environment and is part of a strategy to allocate resources to ensure the health and vibrancy of Suzuki’s overall business, particularly in the areas sustainability, carbon neutrality and alternative fuel technologies. Like all businesses, Suzuki is adapting to a rapidly changing world.

This business decision does not compromise Suzuki’s dedication and commitment to its motorcycle and ATV business or the US powersports market.

Suzuki Motor Corporation and Suzuki Motor USA, LLC are dedicated to the motorsports and American market and will continue to deliver and service the top quality Suzuki motorcycles, ATVs and scooters you have come to expect.

Thanks to you and your hard work, Suzuki Motor USA will continue to build on the recent successful launches of the new Suzuki Hayabusa, GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000GT/GT+ models. Additionally, Suzuki is excited to continue this successful model and will introduce several more new models in the near future. Despite the extreme challenges of the past two years related to the global pandemic, we have managed our business carefully, are in good financial health and are ready for a return to growth.

Additionally, please review the frequently asked questions below:

Why is Suzuki leaving MotoGP?

Suzuki is exiting the MotoGP championship due to current global economic conditions and to allocate resources to ensure the health and growth potential of Suzuki’s overall business.

Does this mean that Suzuki will stop making motorcycles and related products?

No. Suzuki is committed to continuing to do business in the motorcycle category and delivering premium Suzuki motorcycles, ATVs and scooters to its dealers and customers.

Will Suzuki continue to do business in the United States?

Yes. Suzuki will continue to work hard to invest and grow the Suzuki motorcycle business in the United States with several new models coming over the next few years.

Will Suzuki continue its racing programs in the United States?

Yes. In order to market and develop its products, Suzuki plans to continue its racing programs and promotions in MotoAmerica Road Racing, AMA Supercross/Motocross and NHRA Pro Stock Drag Racing.

Will Suzuki ever return to MotoGP?

There are no immediate plans to return to the MotoGP World Championship, but Suzuki may return at a later date depending on its business objectives.

What does the future of Suzuki products look like here in the United States?

The future is bright for Suzuki in the USA The recent success of the new Hayabusa, GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000GT/GT+ is just the start of a series of new Suzuki motorcycles that will be introduced in the near future.

So. Suzuki says there are more bikes to come, stay tuned.

Is that the case? Suzuki is certainly unlikely to pull out of the US market in the immediate future, because (as the memo above points out) it still has several expensive models it wants to sell here.

If Suzuki is here to stay, maybe we’ll still see an updated DR650, with EFI, a sixth gear and ABS? Photo: Suzuki

However, it should also be noted that at the 2010 Chicago Auto Show, then-Vice President Gene Brown said Suzuki’s automotive business was “here to stay.” Three years later, it turned out that was not the case.

Currently, Suzuki is linked to an emissions investigation in the EU, with regulators raiding company facilities in search of defeat-testing devices (early reports sound like Dieselgate 2.0). While it may be a nothing-burger and nothing has been proven in court this can tie up resources that Suzuki had planned to use elsewhere. Then when you add the lack of title sponsorship for its GP team, it’s no wonder Suzuki pulled the plug to save money, and it’s no wonder rumors are circulating about the business plan of Suzuki motorcycles as a whole, especially in light of its recent financial reports. These documents show that the motorcycle division experienced an increase in sales but a decline in profits due to higher material costs.

But again: Suzuki has a full line of well-performing motorcycles at reasonable prices and a worldwide dealer network. Why close this? The sensible thing would be to cut costs to improve margins, and at this point, that’s all Suzuki says it is doing.

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Brittany Force leads NHRA record assault in Friday’s qualifying at Virginia Nationals https://www.labougeotte.org/brittany-force-leads-nhra-record-assault-in-fridays-qualifying-at-virginia-nationals/ Sat, 14 May 2022 03:00:18 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/brittany-force-leads-nhra-record-assault-in-fridays-qualifying-at-virginia-nationals/ Five of six track records were broken in the first qualifying round Friday at the NHRA Nationals in Virginia. If that holds, it would be second in the standings this year and 34th overall for Brittany Force, which now has nine of the 10 fastest races in Top Fuel history. In Funny Car, Matt Hagan […]]]>
  • Five of six track records were broken in the first qualifying round Friday at the NHRA Nationals in Virginia.
  • If that holds, it would be second in the standings this year and 34th overall for Brittany Force, which now has nine of the 10 fastest races in Top Fuel history.
  • In Funny Car, Matt Hagan broke the previous track record by nearly 10 mph.

    Top Fuel points leader Brittany Force powered both ends of the track record at Virginia Motorsports Park, racing to the No. 1 interim qualifier Friday at the NHRA Virginia Nationals.

    Matt Hagan (Funny Car) and Angie Smith (Pro Stock Motorcycle) are also the No. 1 provisional qualifiers, as five of six track records were broken Friday at the seventh of 22 races in the 2022 NHRA Camping World season. Drag Racing Series. .

    In the NHRA’s first appearance on the track in three years, Force clocked an impressive 3.710 seconds at 335.82 mph in his 11,000 horsepower Flav-R-Pac dragster, making the fastest and fastest run ever. in the history of Virginia Motorsports Park. If that holds, it would be second place this year and 34th overall for Force, which now has nine of the 10 fastest races in Top Fuel history. The Stellar Race also allows Force, a two-time winner in 2022, to track ET records at 11 different facilities.

    “It cleared up and (team leader David) Grubnic had set a goal and we achieved that goal,” Force said. “We are delighted with this. It was a good solid race and we hope to do two more tomorrow. (I’m) pretty excited to do this race here in Virginia. It’s been 2019 when we were last here, so to be able to come here for the fans and get it rolling and give them a show was awesome. We just want to keep improving and see what we can do on race day.

    Matt Hagan destroyed the track record in Funny Car on Friday.

    NHRA/National Dragster

    Hagan, the Funny Car points leader, also erased the track speed record, reaching the top with a 3.914 at 335.82 in his 11,000 horsepower Smithfield-branded Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat. The impressive pass broke the previous track record by nearly 10 mph, putting Hagan, who already has a pair of wins this season, on track for his second No. 1 qualifier this season. In his 300th career start, it would also be the 45th career No. 1 qualifier for the Virginia native.

    “I’m so proud of everyone on this team,” Hagan said. “They are all doing a great job and overall I’m pretty happy with this race. That 335 mph is a representation of how powerful this car is. It’s my 300th career start and we have a new look on the car, so it’s good to be the provisional No.1. I’m lucky to do what we do and it’s just cool to stay for 300 races. There’s such a fine line in these cars and everything has to line up perfectly, but that’s just a testament to (crew chief) Dickie (Venables) and our guys.

    angie smith nhra

    Angie Smith broke the 200 mph barrier in Virginia.

    NHRA/National Dragster

    Smith closed out the day with a pair of Pro Stock Motorcycle records, making history with an outstanding 6.788 to 200.38 on his Denso Auto Parts Buell. It is the first 200 mph motorcycle run in the track’s history and also gave Smith the fastest run at VMP. If that holds, it would be Smith’s second career No. 1 qualification as she seeks to claim her first win of the 2022 season.

    “It was very exciting to go 200 mph,” Smith said. “I love this facility and we come here to test often, and it’s just a great track. I’d say it’s my second home and it was a good race. Hopefully we can keep that going. We’re well off the start line and that’s key with these bikes. It’s a very consistent track for us and to see 200 appear on the dash is exciting. You want to put on a good show for the fans.

    Virginia NHRA Nationals

    Friday qualifying

    Friday’s results after the first of three qualifying rounds for the third annual NHRA Virginia National Championships at Virginia Motorsports Park, seventh of 22 events in the NHRA Camping World Drag Racing Series. Qualifying will continue on Saturday for Sunday’s final eliminations.

    Top fuel — 1. Brittany Force, 3.710 seconds, 335.82 mph; 2. Justin Ashley, 3.725, 327.82; 3. Doug Foley, 3.733, 318.69; 4. Doug Kalitta, 3.740, 322.19; 5. Steve Torrence, 3.747, 324.90; 6. Lea Pruett, 3.754, 318.92; 7. Austin Prock, 3.780, 328.38; 8. Mike Salinas, 3.780, 321.81; 9. Millican clay, 3.788, 311.05; 10.Antron Brown, 3.828, 324.90; 11. Shawn Langdon, 3.830, 315.05; 12. Scott Palmer, 3.870, 302.08; 13. Lex Joon, 4.161, 215.41; 14.Josh Hart, 4.181, 203.28; 15. Tony Schumacher, 5.392, 129.32.

    funny car — 1. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.914, 335.82; 2. Dale Creasy Jr., loader, 3.974, 319.07; 3.Blake Alexander, Ford Mustang, 4.007, 304.05; 4. John Force, Chevy Camaro, 4.099, 323.58; 5. JR Todd, Toyota Supra, 4.201, 231.24; 6. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 6.049, 150.30; 7. Phil Burkart, Chevy Monte Carlo, 6.543, 103.13; 8. Alexis DeJoria, Supra, 6.926, 100.52; 9. Ron Capps, Supra, 7.700, 90.86; 10. Jim Campbell, Charger, 7.949, 81.59; 11. Chad Green, Mustang, 7.997, 78.55; 12. Robert Hight, Camaro, 8.517, 84.37; 13. Mike McIntire, Toyota Camry, 9.936, 83.28; 14. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 14.830, 61.88.

    Pro Stock Motorcycle — 1. Angie Smith, EBR, 6.788, 200.38; 2.Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.826, 198.12; 3. Matt Smith, Suzuki, 6.827, 199.32; 4. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 6.828, 197.28; 5. Angelle Sampey, Suzuki, 6.854, 197.36; 6. Eddie Krawiec, Suzuki, 6.868, 196.79; 7. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.871, 196.13; 8. Joey Gladstone, Suzuki, 6.875, 195.25; 9. Marc Ingwersen, EBR, 6.897, 197.05; 10. Ryan Oehler, EBR, 6.932, 198.15; 11. Ron Tornow, Victory, 6.938, 191.57; 12. Kelly Clontz, Suzuki, 7.069, 189.58; 13. Lance Bonham, Buell, 7.147, 187.44; 14.Jianna Evaristo, Suzuki, 7.408, 153.65.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

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Suzuki to demonstrate restored Barry Sheene bikes at Cadwell S… https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-to-demonstrate-restored-barry-sheene-bikes-at-cadwell-s/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:21:02 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-to-demonstrate-restored-barry-sheene-bikes-at-cadwell-s/ SUZUKI has announced that its event, Suzuki Live, will take place in June at Cadwell Park in Lincolnshire. Specifically, Suzuki will take over Cadwell on June 10 and “celebrate both old and new models,” according to a Suzuki press release. There will be track sessions for visitors, as well as a collection of restored Barry […]]]>

SUZUKI has announced that its event, Suzuki Live, will take place in June at Cadwell Park in Lincolnshire.

Specifically, Suzuki will take over Cadwell on June 10 and “celebrate both old and new models,” according to a Suzuki press release.

There will be track sessions for visitors, as well as a collection of restored Barry Sheene bicycles. Suzuki says: “The day will bring together track sessions for bikes of all ages, trials, special guests, presentations of classic bikes and a special parade ride for five of Barry Sheene’s iconic race bikes, recently restored by Suzuki’s vintage parts program.

On the track sessions, Suzuki says there will be 111 places available on the day, spread over three sessions. There will also be three classes: “Classic Novice for those new to track days or riding older classic machines, Classic Intermediate for those more familiar with track days or riding a classic model, and Open Advanced for experienced riders on the latest Suzuki machines,” according to a statement from Suzuki.The price for a track session will be £135, regardless of which class you are registered in.

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Team Solitaire Shows Small Supercross Groups Can Thrive | Sports https://www.labougeotte.org/team-solitaire-shows-small-supercross-groups-can-thrive-sports/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/team-solitaire-shows-small-supercross-groups-can-thrive-sports/ Some teams are literally better equipped to succeed in the Monster Energy AMA Supercross Championship than others in the series. Factory teams backed by the sport’s seven dirt bike manufacturers — companies such as Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha — enjoy bigger budgets and better riders than teams without factory backing. But that doesn’t mean independent […]]]>

Some teams are literally better equipped to succeed in the Monster Energy AMA Supercross Championship than others in the series.

Factory teams backed by the sport’s seven dirt bike manufacturers — companies such as Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha — enjoy bigger budgets and better riders than teams without factory backing.

But that doesn’t mean independent racing teams like Glendale-based Team Solitaire can’t compete and impact the sport.

That’s what brought Team Solitaire co-owners Chris Elliott and Ryan Clark together. The two met while Elliott, a digital marketing expert, was working for a 250SX Supercross team and the pair connected over a common cause.

“We saw an avenue to help runners while remaining (financially) viable in a sport where factories spend millions,” Elliott said.

Supercross is an off-road motorcycle race on courses built with various jumps and tight turns. Unlike motocross, the sport from which Supercross is derived, Supercross races are usually held at football and baseball stadiums across the country. The sport has two classifications: the 450SX class, which includes heavier and faster bikes, and the 250SX class, with riders using less powerful but more agile bikes.

One of the biggest advantages of factory teams in the sport are their bikes – and the latest parts for them. Kawasaki’s 2022 450SR bike, for example, features a new cylinder head, new exhaust system and new shocks and clamps, among other upgrades.

The ability to ride factory bikes backed by big budgets attracts top riders, which adds to the dominance of factory teams. They have won every race in the 450SX class and 250SX class so far in 2022, with races remaining in Foxborough, Massachusetts and Denver as well as the 2022 Supercross World Championship in Salt Lake City on May 7.

Team Solitaire doesn’t get any of the benefits that a factory team gets. Despite improved racing leading to improved season standings, the team is not a serious contender for a season championship.

Yet no one at Team Solitaire is focused on winning the season championships. Instead, Team Solitaire is doing things differently behind the scenes to stay financially viable while providing a testing ground for up-and-coming 250SX West riders.

Few things about Team Solitaire are typical in Supercross, including how the team has evolved.

Early partnership

Elliott’s passion for bicycles was evident at a young age. The passion began to blossom when his father bought him a bicycle. According to Elliott, he and his father spent their free time working on the bike and racing on the weekends.

He remembers the sights and sounds of going to Supercross races once a year when the series traveled to Minneapolis, which the series first visited in 1994.

“Supercross in particular has always been so visually appealing, all the new gear, the shiny bikes. And the show itself was so mesmerizing,” Elliott said via email.

His marketing background and passion for bikes came full circle when he signed a marketing contract with a 250SX Supercross team. While working on this deal, he met Clark.

The partnership blossomed, and in 2016 Elliott and Clark decided to reincarnate Team Solitaire, which Elliott originally started in the early 2000s. The new version of the team entered its first Supercross season in 2017.

Clark, who has lived in Arizona for two decades, calls Team Solitaire his “passion project.”

And the passion isn’t just the love for bikes and Supercross. It’s also about leveraging Elliott’s digital marketing experience to introduce people to the sport in a cost-effective way.

“We’re trying to do these VIP things and single-race partnerships that we think might be a little more affordable for people, and then take them out, get a taste of it,” Clark said.

On race day, that marketing strategy comes to life with special paint schemes, such as the team’s Phoenix Suns-inspired scheme used at Glendale this year. The strategy has been in place for several years, as seen in the team’s Arizona Cardinals-inspired outfit used at the 2020 Supercross event in Arizona. Team Solitaire displayed a special Cardinals-themed bike in the pits ahead of that year’s race complete with a rider’s helmet inspired by the Cardinals’ headgear and a racing suit made in honor of the former star Cardinals Larry Fitzgerald.

The team also uses themes inspired by their current lead partner Nuclear Blast, a heavy metal record label.

make it work

Team Solitaire isn’t just unique in its marketing strategies and paint schemes at various Supercross races. It’s also unique in that everyone has their own responsibilities outside of the team.

Clark works at Stacy and Witbeck, a building contractor. Elliott works as a real estate agent.

Team Solitaire’s two mechanics, Eric Angelski and Colin Burgh, work at Crank Works in Tempe as machinists. Crank Works is a repair shop that specializes in crankshaft services for a variety of vehicles, including motorcycle works that are useful for Supercross work. The company also works on ATVs, personal watercraft, snowmobiles and off-road utility vehicles.

This makes it difficult to get everyone together to work on team-related projects, as they live in different areas of the Valley.

“The last thing they want to do is drive any further west to my house to do that, so we’re just working on what makes sense,” Clark said.

Much like their work building the team’s bikes, Team Solitaire’s mechanics have found the solution to the team’s whereabouts problem.

All of the team’s mechanical work is done in Angelski and Burgh’s garage in Maricopa, where they share a home. According to Angelski, they have renovated their garage to create a space where they have everything they need to work on the team’s Yamaha motorcycles.

“It feels more like a store and more like a workspace,” Angelski said. “Because we have such long hours, it seems like it works better that way rather than having a location and having to go there and then driving home and going to work and doing all of this.”

After finishing their 8-to-5 job at Crank Works, they return home and work Team Solitaire’s bikes late into the night. Angelski estimates he works more than 100 hours a week between his two jobs, comparing his workload to “two full-time jobs and one part-time job.”

In an average season, Angelski and Burgh build eight to 10 bikes. According to Angelski, each bike takes two to three days to complete.

Even on race weekends, the team’s prep work is far from done, with the team using different marketing programs from race to race, Angelski said.

“We usually show up on Fridays to the races and we have to install graphics, plastics and seat covers on the bike,” Angelski said. “Most teams have already done this in the middle of the week or so because their pattern doesn’t really change.”

Working more than 12 hours a day at different jobs can have adverse consequences. However, Angelski said his work for Team Solitaire was not about him or his personal goals.

“You’re ready to do anything to help your runner reach their goal and take it to the next level,” he said.

Fortunately for everyone involved in Team Solitaire, they have the support of their regular employers.

When Supercross came to Glendale in January, Clark felt the love from Stacy and Witbeck in particular. According to Clark, the company’s vice president and project manager came to the Glendale event to support Clark’s team.

At Crank Works, Angelski said he was allowed Fridays off during the season. However, this day off is not the only benefit he gets from the company. He also cherishes what he learns from his bosses.

“To be able to help us with the knowledge that the owner, Phil Schaefer, has about this industry and to be able to help us with so many other aspects is phenomenal,” Angelski said.

Team Growth

Working full time and then taking a second job can be done out of necessity for some. These people may not feel the impact of their work outside of income.

At Team Solitaire, however, each member of the team feels rewarded in some way.

“Honestly, the rewarding part ends up being the creative outlet I have with the team,” Elliott said.

For Clark, seeing his team grow inspires him to keep going. This growth is seen in one runner in particular.

Robbie Wageman has been with the team since 2020. He finished just inside the top 20 in the 250SX West season standings in his first two seasons, then took a big leap this year into the top 10.

“He’s grown tremendously and so for us it’s really rewarding and that’s what keeps us going,” Clark said. “This year we brought in Ryan Surratt, who is just at the beginning of our relationship with him, and we hope to create that same type of growth curve with him.”

Angelski agrees with Clark. From a mechanic’s perspective, he sees his hours and hours of work come to fruition when a rider succeeds on the bikes he builds. It’s worth a season that lasts from January to May, despite the other responsibilities.

“We all work incredibly hard, and we know we work harder than a lot of other people in this industry,” Angelski said. “With a full-time job and everything, it’s super rewarding, especially when you have a good result.”

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Suzuki’s GSX-S1000GT+ delivers thrills without the frills – Robb Report https://www.labougeotte.org/suzukis-gsx-s1000gt-delivers-thrills-without-the-frills-robb-report/ Fri, 06 May 2022 21:02:16 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzukis-gsx-s1000gt-delivers-thrills-without-the-frills-robb-report/ The casual observer could be forgiven for assuming that Suzuki was nearly done after the Covid-19 pandemic. Sure, there was the Hayabusa benchmark sport bike update last year, but no new street bikes debuted in 2020 or 2021. That, however, is finally changing. . Already this year, Suzuki has released three new motorcycles; well, the […]]]>

The casual observer could be forgiven for assuming that Suzuki was nearly done after the Covid-19 pandemic. Sure, there was the Hayabusa benchmark sport bike update last year, but no new street bikes debuted in 2020 or 2021. That, however, is finally changing. . Already this year, Suzuki has released three new motorcycles; well, the same one dressed in three different ways.

A few weeks ago we tested the Suzuki GSX-S1000 naked bike, a model that offers solid performance, but has a few shortcomings. Now we’ve just finished riding the sport touring version of the GSX-S1000GT+, a $13,149 bike that pleasantly surprised even this jaded rider. The little “+” sign at the end of the name indicates that this is the premium of the two GT variants available, but in truth the only difference is a set of side cases of about 43 gallons and an additional $650 added at the price.

The Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ sport touring motorcycle.

Suzuki Motor Corporation

Beneath the skin of the expansive but well-wrapped body is the same 149hp, 999cc inline-four engine (with 78lb-ft of torque), twin-spar aluminum chassis and fully adjustable KYB suspension as on the GSX-S1000 naked bike. The GT+, however, aims to comfortably cover distances its sibling could only dream of, thanks to taller handlebars, a wide screen – deflecting a massive amount of wind at speed – and cruise control, which is sorely lacking. to the GSX-S1000.

Another differentiator of the GSX-S1000GT+ is Suzuki’s first-ever integration of a thin-film transistor (TFT) display. Yes, Suzuki finally came to the TFT party, albeit years after everyone else, but he did a good job with it. That dash is mission control for the ride, and while the bike doesn’t have an inertial measurement unit (IMU) or lean angle sensitive traction control or cornering ABS to adjust, the 6.5-inch display is at least easy to understand and easily pairs with your smartphone via the left switch pad. That’s a mile ahead of the Gameboy-like unit found on the GSX-S1000.

The TFT display of the Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ sport touring motorcycle.

The bike represents Suzuki’s first-ever integration of a thin-film transistor (TFT) display, in this case measuring 6.5 inches.

Kevin Wing

Once you’re ready to roll, you’ll be greeted with that lion-like induction roar that this engine is famous for. The power plant is a descendant of that found on the GSX-R1000 K5, one of our picks for the 25 Greatest Motorcycles of the 21st Century (so far). It’s got so much mid-range torque that it makes for a totally engrossing driving experience, and it’s paired with a splendid quick shifter that’s one of the best on the market today.

Getting back in the saddle of a somewhat analog bike is rather refreshing in the age of electronic suspension and cornering ABS. The KYB suspenders on this bike are divinely old school—springs, shims, and oil, not pneumatics or electronics guiding their way. As such, the rider gets a nice mechanical feel to the handlebars, not one hampered by outboard servos.

Ride the Suzuki GSX-S1000GT+ sport touring motorcycle.

With cruise control, taller handlebars and a wide screen that deflects a huge amount of wind, the bike is the best in the model line for covering longer distances.

Kevin Wing

The GT+ likes to tackle a winding road as much as a highway, probably more. Selecting Mode B (rather than A or the low-output Mode C) for the throttle, I find the Suzuki’s power delivery to be silky smooth – Mode A is too harsh for my liking – and the roads of canyon are the perfect place to let the GT+ do its thing.

Clicking the gears yields an impressive soundtrack punctuated by a barking exhaust note as the bike delivers more than enough power to entertain even the most seasoned riders. And all wrapped up in a rather ladylike costume. Overall, Suzuki’s GSX-S1000GT+ is a big improvement over the GSX-S1000 naked bike, delivering all the thrills without unnecessary frills.

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Suzuki will stop racing “temporarily” https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-will-stop-racing-temporarily/ Tue, 03 May 2022 16:00:16 +0000 https://www.labougeotte.org/suzuki-will-stop-racing-temporarily/ “Abolition of MotoGP??,” you ask. “But didn’t Suzuki already withdraw from WorldSBK??” Yes, 100%; and the brand’s struggle in motorcycle sales could set them back even further before the end of the year. Being the smallest and most conservative race team, Suzuki simply didn’t have the funds (or resources) to assemble more than one team […]]]>

“Abolition of MotoGP??,” you ask.

“But didn’t Suzuki already withdraw from WorldSBK??”

Yes, 100%; and the brand’s struggle in motorcycle sales could set them back even further before the end of the year.

Being the smallest and most conservative race team, Suzuki simply didn’t have the funds (or resources) to assemble more than one team for the circuit.

Now a report of Planet SuperBike tells us that the deletion is largely due to the manufacturer’s financial situation, reduced by a decline in bicycle sales that has been going on for some time.

“…they just can’t afford to race,” shrugs the report.

A view of the Suzuki racing team ready for the 2022 iteration of MotoGP

“Since the global recession hit and sales plummeted, Suzuki has struggled to pay for anything that doesn’t result in motorcycle sales.”

“Suzuki’s precarious financial situation has affected all departments of the manufacturer over the past five years.”

A view of Suzuki's Gixxer range

The situation has become so strict that the report even details the story of a Suzuki rider and brand ambassador (they remain anonymous for privacy reasons), who was invited to a PR event in Japan last year. last “in the name of the manufacturer”.

“He told them he was more than willing to do the event but wanted to mention that he had not been reimbursed for his expenses from the last two trips he made on behalf of the manufacturer in Japan. “, continues the report.

A view of Suzuki's Gixxer range

“He added that he wasn’t crazy to sponsor another trip to Japan if reimbursement was to be governed by a sundial.”

“Suzuki said they would find a solution and call him back. Last time I spoke to him, they hadn’t called him back or refunded him.

A view of the Suzuki racing team ready for the 2022 iteration of MotoGP

Suzuki’s successes in the past were largely due to the GSX-R, almost every unit of which was sold until 2008. Since then, sales of the gixxer lineup have been steadily declining, exacerbated by the discontinuation by other brands competing with the GSX-r. (R6 from Yammie and Kawi ZX-6R) with the aim of building new toys with better technology (R7 from Yammie, Tuono and RS660 from Aprilia).

A view of Yamaha's R6 and Kawasaki's ZX-6R

In short, the money from Suzuki’s bike sales that would have fueled the brand’s racing budget is now crumbs compared to what it used to be. SuperbikePlanet points to a dizzying 15% drop in motorcycle sales for Suzuki’s 2021 fiscal year alone – another 10% drop is noted for 2020 before that, with no mention of motorcycles in the report’s ‘Medium Term Management Plan’ Suzuki Annual.

Stay tuned for updates; the call for an end to racing for Suzuki (at least for MotoGP) has been described as ‘temporary’ so it’s also possible that Suzuki will use the previous MotoGP budget to do something else – hopefully a big flip -face, but we are not yet aware of this information.

What do you think is in store for Suzuki? Drop a comment to let us know what you think, and as always, stay safe on the bends.

*Media from Planet SuperbikePinterest, VisorDown, Top Speed, Motorsport Magazine, MAM and Asphalt & Rubber*

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