Porsche 911 Turbo vs. Suzuki GSX-R1000

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It’s a speed war shootout as Australia’s fastest on four wheels faces off against the baddest in two

Here is a fact. Porsche’s ceramic brakes, standard on this 911 Turbo S, are an $ 18,990 option on the Carrera. An entire Suzuki GSX-R1000 sells for $ 18,950. Yes, a bike costs $ 40 less than brakes.

This article first appeared in the August 2005 issue of MOTOR

We have proven that the Porsche 911 Turbo S is fast. With an ET of 11.9 seconds, it tears up the quarter mile to mark it firmly in supercar territory. Sure, it costs the same as a house, but before we even start bragging, those smug motorcycle idiots start to smirk, suggesting that the true use of the word “super” ends with “bike.” And costs much less. Launchers.

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But frankly, that’s a fair point. As the guys in the car, we’ll gladly sacrifice a bit of speed for the comfort of a roof, radio, air conditioning, windows, heated leather seats, a conversation with a passenger and the safety offered by four tires to avoid imminent death. the next turn in the form of a slab of gravel, a slab of oil, or another rider’s spleen. But exactly what speed do cars sacrifice? And in 2005, can a fast car compete with a fast motorcycle?

As a cyclist I can see both sides of the air conditioned door glass and those who are not used to wearing full leathers for a Sunday morning blast may not realize how crotch rockets are. fast. In a straight line, even a half-decent bike will be in the neighboring suburbs and finish an oil change by the time a fast car shifts into second gear.

Although the GSX1300, R1 and ZX-10R look like chemical compounds, they represent an important speed. And knowing their haughty belief in the superiority of motorcycles, we issued a courteous challenge to our sister mag Australian Motorcycle News (AMCN): “So you bike wankers want to race a car before you kill all of you on the latest Hondasaki PMT1300?” Also try to make do with something decent, because we want something quick to beat… ”

Engine Characteristics Gauges

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“The bike is pushed so far, it scratches its footrests at turn four”

Oddly enough, they accepted. With enthusiasm. If that’s what “Go girls in the car, see you on the track”.
Knowing that our challenge was serious, AMCN called upon the current big gun of supersports, a machine so fast they call it hyperbike: Suzuki’s GSX-R1000. Shit. It might not roll as smoothly as Carrera or Boxster, but roll on a throttle grip and it’ll suck the skin out of your eye sockets faster than you can say “Did I make a will?” “

Starting from just 999cc of fuel-injected, dual-camshaft four-cylinder, the performance of the Suzuki is, as much as it pains us to say, not in another stadium, but in another sport. Although the Porsche is almost three times its power, it is also ten times its weight. Suzuki’s power-to-weight ratio makes a Ferrari Enzo look like an off-roader. A Hummer.

On standard speed tests, it’s laughable: 0-100 km / h in 3.26 seconds is exactly a second faster than the hard-start all-wheel-drive turbo Porsche. And the bike’s 10.4 quarter-mile – faster by 1.6 seconds – included wheel spin on a misty, greasy morning track.

Suziwhitebground engine characteristics

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And that’s Suzuki’s Kryptonite, his touch on Earth.

Tires barely wider than a car’s space saver, with a cellphone-sized contact patch, should transfer power to the road without transferring body parts.

The organ donor in charge of the two-wheeled death machine was AMCN associate editor Sam Maclachlan, a fairly handy bike ballast if 100-meter-long wheels are anything to judge a cyclist.

Knowing the GSX’s reputation for speed and our genuine desire to beat the bikers, we didn’t want to let the car down, so we hired V8 Supercar driver Warren Luff. The experienced Stone Brothers Racing driver attends Porsche Experience training days, holds a bike license and knows the fast path around our chosen challenge track, Wakefield Park, near Goulburn, NSW.

A narrow 2.2 km loop built into the side of a hill, Wakefield favors both car and bike in different areas but with similar results, as evidenced by the current V8 Supercar record of 60.0, against the Superbike lap record of 59.9 seconds.

Engine Specifications Archive 911 Turbo V Bike 911 Oversteer

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TRACK EDGE

It’s time to get serious. With 2 psi front and rear tire pressures, Luff takes to the track in the 911 Turbo S and immediately hits a quick 1: 07.78, breaking our previous record around Wakefield, a 1:07 , 94 in the BMW M3 CSL.

Warren’s strength is his ability to set a quick time early and repeatedly. A lap later he improved it to 1: 07.60, backing it up with a 7.7, 7.8 and a “that’s as fast as she goes”. It’s time to attach the VBox to the bike.

The strengths and weaknesses of the car and the motorcycle are almost opposites around Wakefield. Across the start and finish straight, the bike brakes 50 meters before the turn, one turn, returns to second gear, which it holds for the remainder of the turn.

Engine Specifications Archive 911 Turbo V Bike 911 Oversteer Front

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The 911 brakes “at” the crease, the impressive ceramic and the six-piston calipers reducing the speed of the Turbo to incredibly late distances. Using the fourth, third and second, despite its weight, it uses the stability of all-wheel drive and the grip of four large tires to wash out the speed just as even as the lighter bike. But then the car runs faster.

At the top of turn two, the 911 has a 6 km / h advantage and edges ahead. But going up the hill to turn three, five times the torque means little when the bike’s incredible acceleration winds second gear up to the limiter and puts it back in front of the car with a big 12 km / h advantage.

Hence it is the car with the tight, arched, high lateral g-force corners that allow the car to use its mechanical grip. The 911 loses a bit in the tight turn four because of the quick change of direction which suits the bike better. But in the first three corners, the bike is still spinning, pushed so far that it scratches his footrests – and Sam’s knee sliders – at four.

Features of the Archive 911 Turbo V Bike Suzuki Panoramic front engine

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But the Turbo is quicker in the arched downhill turn five, thanks to the car’s ability to use the extra width of Wakefield’s curb. Warren steers the car’s interior tires toward the smooth sidewalks, straightening the curve and maintaining speed. Sam, on his bike, avoids slippery sidewalks like ice. Who has a bike, they are.

Through downhill right turn and left turn seven the car is flat and full of thrust in third, Warren facilitates a fraction at the entry into seven to shoot in the nose. The bicycle is overturned and unable to cut off the power; standing for just a second between turns, a quick twist of the wrist detonates the bike to reach the Porsche’s top speed of 148 km / h, before being overtaken by the Porsche again in the tight left turn.

Engine Specifications Archive 911 Turbo V Bike Duo Panning Side

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Surprisingly, here at half track, they are tied, each with a split time of 35.5 seconds.

On the second slowest turn on the track, top speed at turn eight returns to the car shifting into second gear, fighting understeer and then, due to Porsche’s front-to-back split, oversteering on the exit before taking the third.

The Turbo makes full use of its eight-to-nine torque and grip, bordering on slipping and holding third gear, for what turns out to be the most interesting comparison on the track.

On the new straight sweeper turn, the car’s mechanical grip gives it an advantage of 10 km / h. But from there, the bike flexes its muscles.

Once standing, the GSX-R storms out of the corner, trying to knock Sam down as the tires follow the seams in the road the 911 didn’t even notice. In the short 200-meter straight, the bike turns a 10 km / h fault into a massive 16 km / h advantage.

But the Porsche brakes 40 meters later and shoots dead even with the bike, both losing in the last turn ten with a split time of 54.1 seconds.

Engine Specifications Archive 911 Turbo V Bike Duo Tracking Front Low

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By braking out of ten, the slowest on the entire track, the bumps disrupt the bike and lift the rear tire off the ground. The Suzuki turns earlier and smoother, where the car points later to straighten the exit. Remarkably, both haul the same 61 km / h at the top.

The Porsche picks up power earlier, but 50 meters from the turn, as the bike straightens up and the Porsche shifts into third gear, it is as if the 911 is dropping anchor as the Suzuki dashes off. crazy speed to be 35 km / h faster at the start. finishing line. The Turbo’s top speed is 201 km / h, although it is in power for 80 meters more. The bike reaches 226 km / h.

Lap time for the bike? Using Warren’s 1min: 07.7sec as a target, Sam increases speed throughout the day from
1: 10s, to 09s, a few 08s, then high 1: 07s. The car is still in the front for most of the day, but Sam grows balls and finally satisfies his one-day complaint of not being able to get heat and grip into the front tire, and from his 12th lap of the session, he does six laps. faster than the Porsche. Its best time of 1: 06.5 is 1.1 seconds faster than the 911 Turbo S.

Then the bike arrives, knocking the Porsche off the post. Of course we used a pro in the car, but we also picked the best bike around.

Yes, a bike pro like Superbike champion Shawn Giles might have gone a second faster and yes the car costs 18 times the price of the bike, but at the end of the day after the final shot, in the dark, with 9 degrees room temperature, Sam rode solo through three twisting hours of freezing wind and the sound of a four-cylinder thrashing at 5,500 rpm in sixth gear.

Warren and I accepted the loss of 1.1 seconds of the car, turned up the heat, CD and talk of the Porsche, and controlled the cruising speed to return to Sydney in comfort.

And I was wondering if Suzuki would consider swapping out a bike for slightly worn ceramic brakes?

Engine Specifications Archive 911 Turbo V Bike Confused Biker

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